Goodbye Netware and hello SLES or Windows?

On 28.08.2012 15:44, Stevo wrote:[color=blue]

kjhurni sounds like they ‘said’:
[color=green]

That’s correct. If the timecard server is running on a Windows
server, then any user/device that connects to it (even if through a
reverse proxy) AND authenticates (ie, you have to login to the app to
use it) requires a CAL.[/color]

So my response to kjhurni’s comment is…

Ok, so why the heck would the software vendor not mention this and
include it in the initial purchase?[/color]

That’s harmless. Most vendors of software which runs on windows servers
not only don’t mention this, they outright actively tell you you don’t
need windows CALs (heck, even Novell itself is guilty of this). Either
because they don’t know better, or, worse, they knowingly lie.

CU,

Massimo Rosen
Novell Knowledge Partner
No emails please!
http://www.cfc-it.de

mrosen;2215656 Wrote:[color=blue]

On 28.08.2012 15:44, Stevo wrote:[color=green]

kjhurni sounds like they ‘said’:
[color=darkred]

That’s correct. If the timecard server is running on a Windows
server, then any user/device that connects to it (even if through a
reverse proxy) AND authenticates (ie, you have to login to the app[/color][/color]
to[color=green][color=darkred]

use it) requires a CAL.[/color]

So my response to kjhurni’s comment is…

Ok, so why the heck would the software vendor not mention this and
include it in the initial purchase?[/color]

That’s harmless. Most vendors of software which runs on windows
servers
not only don’t mention this, they outright actively tell you you don’t
need windows CALs (heck, even Novell itself is guilty of this). Either
because they don’t know better, or, worse, they knowingly lie.

CU,

Massimo Rosen
Novell Knowledge Partner
No emails please!
‘Untitled Document’ (http://www.cfc-it.de)[/color]

Yeah, part of that “this is cheap/free” stuff. Like MS has “free”
sharepoint, but it needs MS SQL, and Windows CALs, etc. etc. etc.

AUGH!


The opinions expressed are my own.
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On Tue, 28 Aug 2012 15:46:01 +0000, kjhurni wrote:
[color=blue]

Yeah, part of that “this is cheap/free” stuff. Like MS has “free”
sharepoint, but it needs MS SQL, and Windows CALs, etc. etc. etc.[/color]

SharePoint can be made to work (IIRC) with the free version of MS SQL
Server (“Express”, I think they call it?)

Jim


Jim Henderson, CNA6, CDE, CNI, LPIC-1, CLA10, CLP10
Novell Knowledge Partner

Jim Henderson,[color=blue]

SharePoint can be made to work (IIRC) with the free version of MS SQL
Server (“Express”, I think they call it?)[/color]

Yes, but you still need CALs for the Windows server…


Anders Gustafsson (NKP)
The Aaland Islands (N60 E20)

Have an idea for a product enhancement? Please visit:
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On Tue, 28 Aug 2012 16:03:57 +0000, Anders Gustafsson wrote:
[color=blue]

Jim Henderson,[color=green]

SharePoint can be made to work (IIRC) with the free version of MS SQL
Server (“Express”, I think they call it?)[/color]

Yes, but you still need CALs for the Windows server…[/color]

That could be, I’ve not had to deal with that. (Did some review of
SharePoint courses about a year ago and licensing wasn’t part of what I
had to deal with).

Jim


Jim Henderson, CNA6, CDE, CNI, LPIC-1, CLA10, CLP10
Novell Knowledge Partner

Good Morning Starshine, The Earth Says “Hello!”


JAMES GOSLING
www.jamesgosling.com’ (http://www.jamesgosling.com)
www.novellblog.com’ (http://www.novellblog.com)

jamesgosling’s Profile: http://forums.novell.com/member.php?userid=9688
View this thread: http://forums.novell.com/showthread.php?t=459123

On 8/28/2012 10:44 AM, Massimo Rosen wrote:[color=blue]

On 28.08.2012 15:44, Stevo wrote:[color=green]

kjhurni sounds like they ‘said’:
[color=darkred]

That’s correct. If the timecard server is running on a Windows
server, then any user/device that connects to it (even if through a
reverse proxy) AND authenticates (ie, you have to login to the app to
use it) requires a CAL.[/color]

So my response to kjhurni’s comment is…

Ok, so why the heck would the software vendor not mention this and
include it in the initial purchase?[/color]

That’s harmless. Most vendors of software which runs on windows servers
not only don’t mention this, they outright actively tell you you don’t
need windows CALs (heck, even Novell itself is guilty of this). Either
because they don’t know better, or, worse, they knowingly lie.

CU,[/color]

Vendors often knowingly lie about anything additional that is necessary
that will increase the cost to implement whatever they are selling and
it works.

On 8/28/2012 10:13 AM, Anders Gustafsson wrote:[color=blue]

Stevo,[color=green]

Ok, so why the heck would the software vendor not mention this and
include it in the initial purchase?[/color]

Because it would make his app more expensive…?
[/color]

Exactly, they lie to keep the acquisition cost they are trying to burn
into your brain low to make it sound reasonable.

It would be like hiring someone to run an event and they told you food
would cost $50/person but they neglected to mention that it would cost
$10,000 to rent the space.

On 30/08/2012 13:12, George wrote:[color=blue]

Vendors often knowingly lie about anything additional that is necessary
that will increase the cost to implement whatever they are selling and
it works.[/color]

Sadly, its largely because most vendors assume that CALs are a “sunk
cost” - for convenience of course, but usually in a MS monoculture shop,
every device already needs a CAL, so they can at least claim the
incremental cost of CALs for them is zero (if you already have them).

Only in cases where a device that wouldn’t normally use a CAL (Or
reasonably could be expected to not do so without needing access to the
vendor’s software, such as data capture devices for a warehousing
system) does that one play thin.

Its one of the insidious things about the constant demand for Exchange
as the email solution of choice - once you have sunk cash on CALs for
every device, mobile or fixed, the additional cost to provide
Sharepoint, f&p etc for those same nodes is only for the server and
package itself - no further CALs are required, and the cost of having
provided them is, in itself, leverage to further utilize MS solutions to
get ROI on that large initial investment in access to the MS world.